Mechanical Innovations

mechanical innovations
Low-Cost, Disposable Device for Manufacture Car T-Cells for Cancer Therapy (RFT-538)

Scientists at NDSU have developed a new device for a scalable, biomanufacturing platform for the production of CAR-modified T-cells while eliminating on-target/off-tumor toxicity and decreasing the current production cost by 500 times (per treatment).  The technology relates to a device to produce modified T-cells comprising a first chamber for proliferating a population of T-cells and a second chamber for modifying the T-cells to express a desired T-cell receptor antigen.  The modified CAR T-cells can be used to treat cancer.

Double Extra-Aortic Counterpropulsion Device (RFT-532)

Scientists at NDSU have developed a double extra-aortic cuff to treat heart failure.  Counterpulsation devices (CPDs) have been the most widely used mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices for treating heart failure (HF) patients. However, these CPDs provide insufficient cardiac output (CO) to meet the needs of New York Health Association (NYHA) ambulatory class IV HF patients. During extra-aortic CPD deflation, retrograde flow may result that reduces the forward kinetic energy (KE) of the aortic flow (AOF) which reduces the potential improvement in CO. To enhance the physiological benefits extra-aortic CPDs we have designed a non-blood contacting extra-aortic two-segmented CPD that can optimize the KE of the AOF and provide additional increase CO to patients’ lives.  

Devices and Methods for Producing Synthetic Silk with Superior Characteristics (RFT-505)

Scientists at NDSU have developed a device and methods to produce spider silk that has the ability to produce silk similar to the silk produced by a spider.Our device mimics the pH and ionic gradients found in the natural gland., but also pulls the fiber from the device as opposed to extruding it via pushing.  This replicates native shear forces that are important for proper alignment of silk proteins. The result is a solid silk fiber that integrates the natural elements of fiber production (i.e. pressure, pH, and ionic gradients) to more accurately replicate the spider's ability to produce silk. Additionally, application of an electric field to the microfluidic device is a unique combination of microfuidic spinning and electrospinning to create a better fiber.

Reversible On-Off Adhesion of Rigid Items Acheived by Adjusting Backing Stiffness (RFT-460)

Scientists at North Dakota State University are developing a technology that brings the repeatable adhesion of sticky notes to rigid items such as plastics, glass, metal, wood, particle board, composites, and even highly pliable materials that you don't want to bend, such as paper or woven materials.This reversible adhesion is accomplished simply by adjusting the degree of rigidity adding stiffness leads to adhesion, while reduced stiffness leads to release.  

Biodegradable Soil Sensors that can be "Planted" with a Seed Mixture (RFT-428)

Scientists working at NDSU are developing biodegradable sensors capable of directly monitoring and reporting the soil environment in which they are placed. The sensors are constructed by using NDSU’s patent-pending “direct write” electronic printing techniques to print circuit and antenna patterns directly onto renewable, bio-based materials. The circuit patterns are printed with trace amounts of metallic materials such as aluminum that are safe for the soil when the sensors naturally biodegrade over time.

Contactless Laser-Assisted Placement of Discrete Electronic Components (RFT-370)

Scientists working at North Dakota State University (NDSU) have discovered a method for the contactless laser-assisted assembly of discrete components such as ultra-thin, ultra-small semiconductor dies and MEMS components onto rigid and flexible substrates.